Judgement Day III – some context

Welsh rugby’s late season double header saw the highest attendance of the three times this jamboree has been held. See what happens when people work together? Now with Roger finally consigned to Rhoose, there are already signs of a resuscitation of the pro-game under the guidance of Gareth Davies.

The 52,762 who turned up in Cardiff to watch the two games represented a big jump on the previous two double headers, up from 30,411 in 2014, and 36,174 in 2013.

So this is all good news, right? Well more bums on seats means more revenue for the pro-game, so let’s not get too negative about this progress. But what about the hype in the media about the attendance figures?

Biggest attendance for a Pro12/Celtic League Fixture in History

That’s really stretching it as this was in fact two games. So you could argue that the attendance per game was 26,381. That’s some way short of Leinster’s 22-18 victory over Munster in March last year, when 51,700 turned up to watch that game in Dublin. In fact, JDIII doesn’t even make the top 10 for the highest Pro12/Celtic League attendances of all time.

Biggest attendance for a pro-game featuring a Welsh club/regional team this century in Wales

That record is still held by Cardiff, and their agonising defeat to Leicester in the HEC in 2009. But JDIII does make it into the Top 10, coming in at number six.

Biggest attendance for a Pro12/Celtic League Fixture in Wales

This is a record that also wasn’t beaten. In the second Celtic League Final, Neath faced Munster at the Millennium Stadium, and 30,076 souls saw Neath go down 37-17 against the Irishmen on that day in 2003.

Biggest attendance for a professional game of rugby in Europe on 25th April 2014

There’s a record that will undoubtedly stand. Leicester’s defeat of London Welsh came in second with 23,016 and Toulouse’s outstanding win in Paris was witnessed by 20,000 (still awaiting LNR’s official figure on that one).

Biggest attendance for a professional game of rugby in the world on 25th April 2014

Sadly, we’re still some way short of that. 45,872 watched the Stormers beat the Bulls in Cape Town.

Until the first double-header in 2013, and since the demise of cup finals that regularly filled the then National Stadium, we’ve been robbed of big domestic games in Wales. The English and French have maintained that tradition and double headers in London have become a regular success. Saracens’ games against Harlequins are now regularly drawing 80,000 plus at Wembley.

As ever with Welsh rugby, the press is always more interested in making a story than reporting on the facts, and are particularly myopic when it comes to historical trends or taking a non-parochial view of events.

Rugby attendances in Wales have dipped since their 2009-10 peak (more on that in later blogs), but perhaps the biggest conclusion we can draw from Judgement Day III is this. Despite all four teams being mostly shorn of their international stars (thank you Warren), and despite the fact that the untouchable Clancy was refereeing one of the games, and despite the pretty poor performances (Ospreys’ aside) that have plagued Welsh club/regional rugby this season, 52,762 people turned up to watch these two games. Now that can’t be a bad thing, can it?

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