Category Archives: Structure of the game

Rants on the structure of the game in Wales

Putting the cart before the horse

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cart before the horse650

Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel
Samuel Johnson (April 7th, 1775)

The CTRL+C+V brigade in the Welsh press have started to call on the WRU to use the threat of ostracisation as a stick to beat players who dare to aspire to play their rugby at a higher level. This sort of institutionalised bullying is usually voiced by the xenophobes who have never lived or worked overseas, suckered in cushy jobs where their careers are secure as long as they tow the party line.

But as we all know, rugby players have short careers that can be brought to an end with the next tackle. Already almost all give up thoughts of a career running parallel to that outside the game – they could be left without a job and marketable skills at any time should injury strike. And now the press wants to pressurise players to take a massive cut in their salaries on the off chance that they will have a run of games playing for Wales?

But to bully the individual – that favourite tall poppy syndrome so loved by the Welsh – is a far easier option than to look at the root cause of the problem. Instead of asking why Wasps can potentially offer Leigh Halfpenny a salary far in excess of that which he could earn in Wales, the pro-establishment view is that we should accuse him of a lack of patriotism if he opts for the cash over the chance of just one more game for Wales (for as we know, at any time it could be his last).

The bottom line is that the press in Wales are so cosy with the WRU, that they fail to even discuss the real issues in Welsh professional rugby as these run to the heart of the back-scratching , nepotistic, insular nature of the sport.

Using the Welsh jersey as a means of blackmailing players is 100% reactive and does not address the root cause of the problem.

downward spiralThe argument runs that Welsh pro-teams lack the funds to retain talent, so they must rely on the WRU to part-fund their top players’ salaries with partial central contracts. But salaries are on the rise, so these contracts will need to become larger and larger. And where does the money come from? Yep, more internationals, which means the national coach wants every more access to players. More access to players by the national coach, means less access to the players by pro-teams’ coaches. No wonder the performances of our pro-teams have suffered. With performances poor, finding new investment is …. well, challenging. So the owners of the pro-teams go cap in hand to the Union for more money. And so the spiral continues.

Because of the WRU’s failure to agree to the offer an Anglo-Welsh league made 15 years ago, Welsh pro-teams are now stuck in a league run purely to produce players for the national squad. The league is so devalued, that it ran concurrently to the recent Rugby World Cup.  With such a small population base, TV rights are tiny when compared to those in France and England. And this is where revenues are really growing in the sport – TV money.

Fairly obviously, there is a limit to how many international games can be played in a season, though the Unions are doing their best to keep on flogging that dead horse. How can we break the spiral?

Using the threat of not getting selected for your country

Some in the press advocate using a players desire to represent his country as a (distasteful) way to alleviate this problem – they are too close to the establishment to address the real issue which is how to boost the club game through more investment. There is simply no discussion of this issue in Wales. Vacuous statements calling for our players to return home are made, but there’s no discussion of what’s stopping them. Citing examples of other countries like Australia’s recent changes, rather ignore the point that Australia is haemorrhaging players to the French and English leagues despite the fact that disruption of lugging your family across the globe is a little more disruptive than getting in your car and driving across the Severn to Bath every day.

The answer is the perennial problem in Welsh rugby – namely the WRU’s desire to control all aspects of the game … including the professional clubs.

The solution

The rate of growth of the club game in Europe is staggering. Crowds in France are now approaching the level seen in soccer and huge TV deals follow. Meanwhile, in England, across the board, attendances are booming and the popularity of the sport is also attracting record TV deals. And neither countries have enjoyed particularly successful international results of late.

Wales is a tiny country, and raising the drawbridge and ignoring these two markets on our doorstep demonstrates the worst case of myopia. Only through a vibrant, competitive club game can we retain our best players in Wales.

upward spiralSo the solution is for the WRU to focus on making our four teams vibrant, successful commercial businesses. They should be working with the RFU and begging the English clubs for access to their pyramid – even if it means entering the lower levels for there is no future in the present structure. If they can deliver a British League, then suddenly Welsh teams will have access to a much larger market and much larger TV money. Suddenly, it will make long term sense for players to keep playing in Wales. Pro-teams will improve, and success will follow.

With the WRU now (relatively) awash with cash, they should be using these funds to put a deal on the table that delivers a league that gives Welsh pro-clubs access to the English TV market.

A cycle of dependencey

So why isn’t this happening? Whether it’s the blazers at the Union or the press that refuses to ask the challenging questions or even some of the chairman at Welsh pro-teams, they are all stuck in a cycle of dependence that will see the professional sport spiral into oblivion in Wales. Put simply, so many individuals know that they are simply not up to the level of professionalism at English and French clubs. They would need to massively up their game. And we all know that’s the case in our press for it was only the English media who asked the searching questions during the Rogercaust.

But sadly, as we approach the denouement of meaningful professional club rugby in Wales, the press chooses to focus on the international end of the sport. They are putting the cart before the horse. The international calendar – as convoluted and disjointed as it is – is saturated. Growth will come/is coming from the club end of the sport.

But let’s not push for meaningful change in the focus of our game. Let’s instead focus on pressuring individual players. Heaven forbid that as a professional athlete you should want to play in a competitive league, with the chance to win trophies, in front of full stadia, working with real professionals at all levels of the game.  That would make you unpatriotic.

John Feehan and the Pro12

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A recent interview with Pro12 head John Feehan, made a number of claims relating to the Pro12. We take a look at one of them, namely that “significantly more people attended the matches this season than last season”.

Unsurprisingly for an Irishman based in Dublin, his views are very much coloured by what is happening in his own geography.

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Glasgow’s success on the pitch this season has seen record numbers at Scottish grounds[1. All the data used to compile this article is taken directly from the Pro12 web site (or previous iterations of this web site).]. Significantly more people attended matches in Scotland – a 16% increase[2. The authors make no claim as to the voracity of this data.] on last season.

It was also a record for the Irish with 567,052 people attending Pro12 games .

However, things are very different in Italy. Putting aside the discussion on non-payment of €1.5m[3. There’s a lack of clarity on the exact amount involved. Some press reports quote FIR president Alfredo Gavazzi, claiming that “The (previous) €3million fee has been reduced to less than a third … it’s a huge victory”, whereas other press outlets claiming the figure is €1.5m] this past season has seen the second lowest attendance at Pro12 fixtures in Italy. In the first season of Italian representation in the league, over 83,000 people watched league games in Italy. In the 2014-15 season, almost 20,000 fewer people watched Pro12 games.

At this point, it may be a good idea to ask why John Feehan ignore these facts, or is it that he is simply unaware of the failure of Pro12 to grow the game in Italy?

Finally, let’s take a look at the Welsh clubs.

In the stands ….

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Pro12 attendance in Wales increased to is 353,248 – a growth of 22,151 on last season. A large chunk of this is down to the increased success of Judgement Day – which we’ve already covered elsewhere. This is a 7% increase on last season. However, it is actually less than two season’s ago when the total home attendances topped 359,000. From a Welsh perspective we think Mr Feehan is over-cooking the turkey somewhat.

Let’s look at how each club fared.

Cardiff Blues

Cardiff Blues

Despite the product on offer, despite the losses, despite the poor performances, Cardiff retained their title the best supported rugby club in Wales. That really is a remarkable fact. Hard work off the pitch in marketing the “Blues” brand seems to be paying off. Attendances are up when one would expect them to be down.

An average of 8,863 attended fixtures at CAP (and the double header at the Millennium Stadium[4. Double header attendances are split in two for analysis purposes.]). This represented an almost 10% increase on Pro12 attendances on last season. There is still some way to go to reach the heady days of 10,000+ as an average gate reported when the club played at the soccer stadium, but the overall trend us up from the 2010-11 season. Credit to Richard Holland and the staff at CAP for growing the popularity of the club. Selling a poor product is tough, and they’ve excelled in selling it better than before.

Fact check: So is this significantly more than last season? 10%? We say yes. 

Scarlets

Scarlets

The Scarlets average home crowd of 7,069 is the lowest in 10 years at the club. Despite a mediocre season in Llanelli, they remain some way ahead on the pitch of teams based in Cardiff and Newport. So why this dip in popularity?

Looking at the Scarlet’s performances across all competitions, they’ve had worse (or equally bad) seasons in the last 10 years – in particular the 2007-8 season (with only 5 wins at home that year) – but this season is an all time low.

Fact check: So have “significantly more people attended … matches this season”? Absolutely not. This season was not far short of disastrous for the Scarlets.

Ospreys

Ospreys

On the pitch, by some margin, the Ospreys remain the most successful Welsh club in the history of the Celtic League in all its guises. Indeed, the 2014-15 Pro12 season saw them undefeated at home. In the early years following the realignment of the professional game, the Ospreys were by some margin the best supported club in Wales. In the 2006-7 season, attendances for Pro12 games averaged at over 9,000, but since then – other than the 2012-13 season – those levels have not been reached. This season’s average of 8,398 is up just under 6% on last season, but again a 10%+ fall on the 2012-13 peak.

Fact check: So is this significantly more than last season? 6% is a fair rise, though the long term trend is still fairly flat. This is despite on-field success and must be a concern for the board in Swansea.

Newport Gwent Dragons

Newport Gwent Dragons

A Pro12 final position of 9th saw the Dragons finish above Cardiff Blues for the first time since 2004-5. A feel-good run of victories in the European Challenge Cup raised spirits at the club and this translated to an increase in gates. The club also finished 9th in the 2013-4 season, but last in the season before.

The Dragons won only five games at home in the Pro12 this season – pretty much par for the course in recent years.

For seven seasons, total Pro12 attendance hovered between the mid-40Ks to mid-50Ks level, but this season 85,614 souls enjoyed the Pro12 journey from the terraces in Newport. This is a 19% increase on last season.

Fact check: So is this significantly more than last season? Absolutely, it certainly is. 19% is a big increase for the club, though it is debatable whether performances in the Pro12 itself are behind this increase.

In conclusion …

Contrary to the view often expressed in the media, there is little evidence to suggest there is a direct correlation between winning form on the pitch, and attendance at Pro12 fixtures. Witness Cardiff’s 2012-13 season which saw only three home wins but an average gate of just shy of 9,000. Clearly other factors are at play which lie outside the scope of this analysis.

Turning to Mr Feehan’s comments, as you would expect, little effort seems to have been made to make a close examination of country-by-country trends, or even club-by-club trends.

Glasgow’s rise in Scotland has boosted interest from a very low level, but the SRU remains intransigent in the face of approaches to set up more pro-clubs with investors pressing for action. The blazers like to keep control and this is holding back the growth of the game. Finishing last in the Six Nations does not seem to have shaken this resolve.

John Feehan’s Irish sides continue to succeed in the Pro12. Connacht have enjoyed their most successful season ever.

But the facts elsewhere seem to have escaped Mr Feehan. Despite the Dragons’ increase in gates, Welsh rugby remains flat. Good work in Cardiff is offset by disaster in Llanelli and support in Swansea has been poor – despite continuing successes on the pitch.

And as for rugby in Italy, could the situation be any worse?

Perhaps Mr Feehan needs to look beyond his own borders and look at the Pro12 as a whole?

 

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European Competition Attendances

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As Europe’s rugby season draws to a close, this past weekend saw the first of the season’s finals played – the European Cup and Challenge Cup featured teams from France, England and Scotland. This season saw the demise of European Rugby Cup Ltd (or ERC), the company set up to run Europe’s club competitions, with nine equal shareholders represented on the Board of Directors: Rugby Football Union, Premiership Rugby, Fédération Française de Rugby, Ligue Nationale de Rugby, Irish Rugby Football Union, Scottish Rugby Union, Welsh Rugby Union, Regional Rugby Wales and Federazione Italiana Rugby. This season has been seen the first competitions organised by the new body European Professional Club Rugby (or EPCR).

A key component in revenues generated by professional sport is TV money and ERC’s poor performance in this area was one major reason why it was wound up. More on this to follow in subsequent blogs, but inevitably interested parties will also turn to attendance figures as a benchmark for how well the two competitions – the Champions Cup and Challenge Cup – have faired this season.

Challenge Cup attendances

First the good news. Total attendances in the Challenge Cup fell just short of the 400,000 mark – up by over a fifth from last season. Furthermore, the average attendance at fixtures also rose to its highest ever point.

However, this figures should come as no surprises having the participation of lesser rugby nations like Spain or Portugal. Furthermore, the presence of an extra Welsh club also boosted attendance figures.

Champions Cup attendances

The Champions Cup saw a reduction in participants. When the competition began in 1995-96, only 15 fixtures were played. In the following season this grew to 47, but then in subsequent years, boycott from English clubs resulted in a fluctuating fixture list. Finally, from 1998-99 to 2013-14, 79 fixtures were played, whereas this season, this was reduced to 67. Unsurprisingly, with this reduction in the number of fixtures, total attendance dipped to under 1m – the first time that has happened since the 2011-12 season.

Turning to average attendances, despite a 3% growth on last year’s average, EPCR will be disappointed that despite the supposed extra focus on quality, averages attendances did not surpass the peak in the 2008-9 season of 14,874. Interestingly, there seems to be a four-year cycle appearing in Champions Cup attendances with new peaks reached every four years. Perhaps this reflects an influence from a looming Rugby World Cup, though this is far from clear.

Breakdown by country

Analysing attendance by country is somewhat distorted if one includes data on knock out phase fixtures, as these are not guaranteed in any one geography every season. So in this section, I’m focussing merely on pool games, where there has been more parity between participants.

Apart from the fact that it’s probably not such a good idea to use such garish colours in a chart, at first glance, it seems there’s a limited amount we can learn from this chart. All countries suffered a fall in paying customers at the grounds.

Implications for Welsh rugby

But a closer look reveals something alarming for fans of Welsh rugby. Unsurprisingly, with a cut from three to two teams participating in the Champions Cup this season, there’s been a fall in attendance figures. But what a fall! Fewer people watched top European competition (and this is pool games only, remember) this season than at any time since the 1998-99 season. Only 46,892 attended Champions Cup pool fixtures – down from a peak of 126,811 in the 2008-9 season. That’s a fall of 73%.

Looking at the data in percentage terms, the effect is even more striking. Whilst the contribution of English and French fans has been steady, the increasing popularity of European competition in Ireland is clear to see. What is more striking however is the shrinking of the Welsh figure.

And finally ….

These trends raise a number of questions for Welsh rugby. Should we be worried about the drop of almost 80,000 in the attendance at European Champions rugby games in Wales? People will surely just watch Challenge Cup games instead, right? Subsequent blogs will address these questions, but perhaps a more fundamental question that needs to be answered is why Welsh rugby sacrificed a guaranteed place in Champions rugby? What did we gain for this sacrifice? Some may argue that our teams are not competitive in this competition, but the only way to get better is to play against the best. After all, Cardiff are one of only two teams to defeat Toulon in Europe in the last two years. Paying customers are attracted by quality – even the quality of the opposition. Without that exposure, our clubs are being robbed of revenue and the game in Wales will suffer. Finally, the best sporting competitions are comprised of participants any of whom can win on a given day. Cardiff indeed proved this two seasons ago. But with the huge disparity in TV deals signed between England, France and the Pro12, what can be done to arrest the transformation of the European Champions Cup into an Anglo-French competition?

Notes on the data used to compile this blog:
1. Attendances are missing from official records for the early seasons of the Challenge Cup which renders that data unsuitable for comparison purposes.

Dogma or Financial Common Sense?

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The present stand off in Welsh rugby seems to be about what freedoms and rights four individual, privately owned, businesses have under the regulations of the IRB and the WRU. There is an enormous legal battle involved therein which is beyond the wit of most men, certainly me. My hope is that this dispute does reach the courts because we need rugby to modernise across Europe, in line with the law of our Continent and in line with modern business practices.

We have the owner of Toulon looking to challenge the rights of the IRB (especially Regulation 9 about player release for international windows and more) in the European Courts, so a challenge within the Courts of England and Wales as to whether Unions can block their clubs from playing wherever they like will be an interesting addition to that challenge.

However, we must hope that both parties in Wales have the same goal and that goal must be to have four strong professional teams who are able to compete on a cross border basis, aiming to compete with the much financially stronger French. If both sides have that goal then the difference is clearly on how to achieve it.

The Regions clearly want to choose the competitions they play in and to negotiate their own broadcast contracts. The reason for this is entirely obvious: clubs in France and England have this ability already and are significantly more successful in bringing in revenue than are the Celtic Unions. The figures prove this: the Pro12’s TV revenue for next season is (potentially, based on participation) about £9.5m a year across 10 teams. The French contract is approximately £60m across 14 teams, the English contract is approximately £27m across 12 teams.

Therefore, it is quite obvious as to why RRW want a piece of the English pie and not the Celtic pie. It is also reported that should there be an Anglo-Welsh league next season then that would be worth £4m a year to the RRW teams.

On top of that, we have on the table an offer for a Rugby Champions Cup which is to be broadcast by BT Sport and to be run by the participating clubs. This, according to RRW, is worth £1m more per year per team than the offer for a continuation of the Union controlled ERC tournament.

So, it is all about the money. And why not? This is professional sport, after all. The recent investigation into Welsh rugby by PWC indicated that the RRW teams must find ways to increase their income and this is exactly what they have done.

Now doesn’t this seem all well and good? Why would a Union have an issue with its member clubs acting this way as it is exactly how the French and English clubs act?

Well, the answer seems to be control. It seems as though the WRU is reluctant to allow the clubs to act that way as, under the Agreement they work to at the moment, all of the above work (competition choice and broadcast contract negotiation) is undertaken by the WRU. The easy dig at that belief is to note that the Unions have performed pretty poorly at both of those tasks as the Pro12 is neither popular with supporters nor financially attractive to broadcasters.

So is it just dogma that is preventing the Union allowing RRW to choose its own competitions and negotiate its own TV deals? Well, there are a few straw men arguments that go alongside this which must be considered. The first is that allowing RRW to act in this way will somehow undermine the amateur game in Wales or cause it financial difficulties. This is an argument that I find utterly alien as I don’t see how the amateur clubs are affected by whether the Ospreys play Leinster or Leicester. I’ve never seen a written coherent prose for this argument but it is often raised. The financial side of the concern is simply addressed by the WRU issuing a “tax” of a small percentage on any competition income generated by RRW.

The next straw man argument is that, by wishing to negotiate their own deals, RRW want to control the entire game in Wales. This is a particularly crazy argument as RRW teams have a difficult enough task running their own business so quite why they’d want to make that more difficult by being a controlling influence over the amateur game is beyond me. There is the thought that the RRW teams will want to be more involved in the pyramid of talent production but surely the only dissenting voices to that idea will be those at risk of losing their position of local influence.

The biggest straw man argument is that allowing RRW this freedom will negatively affect the Six Nations. This is a particularly large pile of nonsense. The simple truth is that the French have the purchasing power to attract whichever players they want, with the English getting the next best. This is already in place, it is happening and it will happen for years to come as both the English and French leagues have broadcast contracts in place for years to continue this trend.

Therefore, the best players from Ireland and Scotland will leave their countries regardless of whether RRW negotiate their own deals or not. The biggest risk to the Six Nations is the Toulon challenge of the IRB Regulation 9, not whether the Ospreys can raise their salary cap from £3.5m a year to £5m.

The only real argument to this issue is that the WRU signed up to a Pro12 contract which has a three year rolling notice term that is yet to be announced. There could be a significant charge to the WRU for not fulfilling its obligations to enter its best teams into the competition. However, the WRU is no position to do this because, if the RRW teams go rogue, it will need to enter its own teams which will clearly be inferior. So the other Unions (mostly the IRFU and SRU, as the Italians may leave the league anyway) choose to sue then the WRU seems powerless to prevent it. Alternatively, the WRU could back an AW league on the proviso that RRW teams play out the three remaining years of that Pro12 contract in return.

The benefit of this could be that the Welsh Premiership is freed of the clubs which own the regions, allowing that tier to be truly independent and competitive, whilst the RRW teams have a guaranteed “A” competition in the Pro12 so that talent is given game time.

Wales has already exported too much talent. There are already too many Welsh qualified players playing outside of Wales. If RRW ploughing their own furrow can both bring most of those players back whilst keeping most of our better players (noting that the French will always have the pick) then this is only a good thing for Welsh rugby.

So unless the WRU can negotiate contracts of the value that RRW are already being offered, their resistance to RRW acting this way can only be because of dogma, because of fear for the loss of their influence, because of the loss of £10m+ from the company turnover. There can be no other sensible defence.

For me, all parties benefit if RRW goes its own way. The WRU will be able to renegotiate an Agreement for player release rather than lose that ability altogether, more money will come into the game for the WRU to spend on its amateur arm and it will spend less time administering its professional arm. It’s only dogma and personality preventing this.

Years of decline and wasted time….

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It wasn’t so long ago that Cardiff were thrown out of competing in the Welsh League because the club refused to sign a long term agreement with the WRU. This was at a time when professionalism was new to the game and some of the clubs were fighting the Unions for control of the game, it’s assets and it’s future.

Doesn’t that sound familiar?

This week we have heard from Nigel Wray, the Saracens Chairman, that the Welsh teams should join the Aviva Premiership which is remarkably similar to what happened when Cardiff (and Swansea) were thrown out of the Welsh League. They had campaigned for the Welsh clubs to go with the English clubs and won an agreement for a year long competition, after the Rebel Season had finished, for four Welsh clubs to play in such a competition. That year was to be spent with all four parties (the RFU, the WRU, the Welsh clubs and the English clubs) sorting out the future of the competition in terms of ownership, income generation and the distribution of that income to the participants.

Cardiff had put Welsh rugby on the front foot with these negotiations and Peter Thomas was leading the way, but the fight was won by Vernon Pugh and Glanmor Griffiths of the WRU. They blocked the tournament, Cardiff and Swansea lost their bottle and we have been subjected to over a decade of dreadful Celtic rugby ever since.

Of course, there was a backlash within Wales. The minor clubs were up in arms and the tail wagged the dog. We have seen the myth of “regional rugby” imposed and now we see the domestic game dying in Welsh rugby.

The loss of the HEC next season will leave a hole of £5.5m into the professional game in Wales. The HEC generates almost as much for the four teams (yes, the Newport GD get an equal share despite not playing in the competition) as does the International game. This is a key point: what the WRU pays for access to the players is only slightly more (£6m) than the HEC pays just for playing in the competition. That £5.5m is before gate receipts and match day takings, of course, so it is pretty obvious that the HEC generates MORE for the professional game in Wales. In the unlikely event that one of the three teams get to the knockout stages then all of the prize money (and it is substantial) that they earn is then theirs.

The key part of that £6m from the WRU is that it is for access to players outside of the IRB window. For those who think that the professional game in Wales either doesn’t need that access or will be able to negotiate it from other club organisations, you have to wonder why a Union would do that instead of ensuring its own domestic supply chain is strong AND you have to wonder if the Union would be able to pay the demands of those foreign club organisations. Once the players are lost from playing in Wales then the access to them is much more difficult and, potentially, much more expensive.

So that’s the scene we now have in Welsh rugby. Over a decade ago, the clubs had the opportunity to lead their destiny but now they are solely reliant on others doing that for them. Do the clubs side with the WRU and be subservient forever with no change of making the business pay, or do they push to side with the clubs and face another Union / Minor clubs backlash?

Cardiff used to be good. They used to be a top team. They used to be leading these negotiations and, at one point, the Chief Executive of Cardiff was a board member of the organisation that ran the English club game. Nowadays, however, Cardiff lose at home to the worst professional team in Europe. Nowadays, Cardiff are reliant on old favours and memories for a place at the top table in European rugby.

And the irony for the regionalists is that what could allow Welsh professional rugby to survive is the relationships built up well before 2003, whilst the time spent since 2003 has been navel gazing to appease the Villagers instead of pushing forward the professional game.

Discredited

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Back in October, Tom took a look at the failing Celtic League and asked whether we are anywhere near to reaching viable attendance figures based on Dai Moffett’s target of 8,000. The conclusion then was that gates had actually fallen since the days of the village league, when a well funded Newport were regularly attracting over 6,000 per game, the pre-amalgimated Swanseas and Neath were both attracting over 4,000 and Cardiff’s home gates were not far from those enjoyed at Dave Parade.

Two seasons into the Celtic League, have things improved? Uh, no. We are still along way from the 8,000 figure. But all credit to Dai, at least he’s admited his mistake and is now finally trying to get some involvement with the English teams – something the WRU refused to do in the past when they had a golden opportunity to buy into the English market and grow Welsh rugby.

All the data used to calculate the figures below comes directly from the Celtic League web site – don’t believe the figures? Work it out for yourselves.

Ceptic League – cut the cr@p

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As we forecast more than four years ago even before the first ball was kicked in anger, the much hyped Celtic League still remains sponsorless. Over the years, the Union has shown itself manifestly incompetent in running the sport in Wales, running up huge depths and overseeing the decline of playing levels to such an extent that Wales is now firmly second division in rugby terms. So how should we reward this mismanagement of the international game? Simple. Allow the Union to control club rugby as well! Obvious, isn’t it?

We’ve strongly advocated a professional structure separate from the confines of Union control, with clubs given the freedom to market their own player and their own team. Clubs should be allowed to generate the own sponsorship. The clubs’ role is to provide players for the national team – those good at it, should be financially rewarded by the Union, and those who do nothing for the national team should not receive Union handouts. We’ve been saying for years that the Union should stick its nose out of club rugby and instead invest in the grass roots of the sport. Player development should be left to clubs where competition for places will provide the necessary impetus to player development.

But the argument has moved on in the last four years. We always knew that Cardiff Rugby was run for the benefit of ex-players and the privileged few, and now this old boys club is under serious threat from the biggest old boys club of all – the WRU.

Sadly, neither party is interested in the future of the sport – increasing spectator numbers, more sponsors and better facilities. Far from it. The battle ground is over control of the sport – and the Union is winning.

We take a look at the Celtic League and ask the question, who is benefiting from this structure? Supporters? Coaches? Players? Investors? The Media? Or is the league more Ceptic than Celtic?

Supporters

Local rivalry in Welsh rugby is as old as the hills. The strength of the top teams may have changed – no Neath vs Aberavon and Maesteg vs Bridgend capturing the attention of thousands – but intense rivalry has been one of the traditional strengths of the game in Wales. The “new” buzzword has been intensity – but we’ve had it for decades! What is more intense than a Cardiff-Newport game, or a Neath-Llanelli game? These are the games that have traditionally drawn the biggest crowds. So what’s happened since the start of the Celtic League – are there any significant changes?

Well, the good news for Moffett is that attendances are on the increase*. The Celtic League – although sponsorless and overexposed on our TV sets – has seen attendances in Wales rising consistently from 2001 onwards. It’s probably too early to judge this season, but if we plug in the averages, the results are clear – average attendance is now approaching six thousand (not so far from Moffett’s target of 8,000). Last season, Celtic League attendances in Wales approached a quarter of a million. So everything’s rosy? Right? Well, not quite.
capcrowdsLooking in more detail, the biggest growth in attendance has been the stand alone kings – Llanelli. Average gates have more than doubled between 2001-2 and this season – now standing at an average of over 7,200. In fact, ALL the growth in attendances has been at the home of our Turkish brothers.

At CAP, attendance has fallen from an average of just under 6,000 to 4,500.

Rodney Parade has seen a similar dip in average attendance – though there are signs that the disenfranchised are returning in an effort to reclaim their club from the hands of Moffett. What about that model of regionalism – the Ospreys? Well, two into one doesn’t really go, and they’ve also lost around a thousand supporters a home game from when they operated as two separate teams. But the biggest loss of spectators (of course) is as a result of Moffett’s demolition job on Pontypridd and to a lesser extent Bridgend. During the 2001-2 season, an average of 6,000 spectators was watching these two clubs. Inevitably, when they merged, the figure dropped to less than 3,000.
rodneycrowdsAnd the conclusion to all these facts and figures?

Rationalisation at the top of the sport was much needed, but Moffett’s tactics have alienated thousands of Welsh rugby supporters, and driven them away from the game. Where are these missing thousands? Will the remaining professional clubs be able to entice these fans to return to the professional sport? The figures suggest otherwise – with the negligible gates at the Brewery Field, and the missing thousands who should be supporting the Ospreys.
ospreyscrowdsThese missing supporters have little identification with the new clubs. Franchises were the obvious solution, but the WRU missed the chance to make the system open and fair – smoke filled rooms and dodgy deals are the preferred solution leading to unsubstantiated rumours alleging all sort of dirty dealings. Clubs used to represent your community – your home town or city. It was the club you first supported as a child with your father …. an identification that grew up over years and decades. Now, that very same club has either disappeared, or been taken away by the Union. There is no identification with a club born out of a bad marketing dream – as a result, supporters lose their loyalty, and there is no passion for the club. No passion in the stands matched by no passion on the pitch and this removes that intensity which set us ahead of the competition.

The away fans have gone from the game and that special buzz that stood Wales aside from the dry and insipid atmosphere of English rugby are gone. There is no banter, no sense of rivalry, no atmosphere, and yes that word again, the “intensity” of parochial rivalry is gone. A total lack of occasion diminishes the experience of watching rugby and reduces it to pantomime. No pyramid in the sport means no competition for places in Europe, no reward for excellence (clubs not rewarded for producing top players and not penalised for failing to qualify for Europe), and no relegation. A guaranteed place in Europe is bad for the sport.

Coaches

In appointing Ruddock, the WRU sent a clear message out to Welsh club rugby. Vocal for many years in his support of the Irish system of Union-control, Ruddock was the perfect appointment for the WRU and he quickly began his constant assault in the media with his mantra of Union-controlled “regionalism” (whatever that means). Gareth Jenkins – the most successful and skilful coach in Welsh rugby with a proven record of success – never stood a chance of the job. He is a club man, Llanelli through and through, and would never support the increased control by the Union over the sport.

With the demise of the Warriors, Jenkins was further cut out – deprived of a chance to strengthen his ageing squad by the politics of the Union. All this is never out in the open never open to public scrutiny and only open to the charge of underhand tactics.

So is this Celtic League good for our coaches? Well, one thing is for sure, the Union-controlled Irish structure has lost at least two class coaches in recent season – Alan Solomons and Warren Gatland. Why did they leave? Could it be that they wanted more control over their charges and wanted to coach the way they wanted to? What new excellent fresh coaches have joined the Celtic set up? Uhm ….. none. And who would want to? Even Irish chief executives are complaining about a lack of support from the IRU.

Coaches can’t chose their own squads – Union interference in the running of the clubs means that squads will now be limited to two foreigners. Is that a good thing? What we need in Wales are experienced foreigners who can have an educational influence on Welsh players. Tiechmann and Percy have been/were excellent additions to the game, boosting interest and crowds as well as acting as role models. Who can forget the influence of Peter Muller at Cardiff? Now we have “open warfare” by the Union against “foreigners” – hardly an atmosphere conducive to attracting the best. The result is that more and more foreigners are signed as cheap solutions to budgeting problems.

Coaches have no guarantee that players are available – Ruddock’s control over Welsh squad players causes an intolerable disruption for club coaches. How can Dai Young plan his training sessions when he doesn’t know how many players will be there and how many will be with Ruddock? It wouldn’t be so bad if the Welsh coach had a positive influence on players, but for Cardiff in recent season we’ve seen players confidence ruined by the mismanagement of Henry and Hanson.

Coaches have no guarantee that the players in their squad actually want to be there. Gareth Williams was told to play for Cardiff – Alfie was told not to and we can only speculate about Sidoli who clearly looks like he wants to be somewhere else. Players are already being “forced” to play where they don’t want to. We already have central control and central contracts in all but name.

Players

Is this structure good for player development? Central control means there’s little identification with the club they are forced to play for. The days when players saw clubs as their own – playing for their home town or city – are fast disappearing. The Union is trying to replace this sense of identity with a circus of mercenaries drifting around from one allocated club to another. They can no longer chose which club they want to play for.

The Celtic League is fast turning into a graduation school for the Zurich Premiership and French Leagues. Stephen Jones, Alfie, Gareth Llewellyn, Gary Powell(!), Richard Parks, Christian Loader, Darren Morris and Colin Charvis are all playing “overseas” with the “foreigners”. When the stars of our game leave, who attracts youngsters to the sport? With Rhys William’s and Jamie Robinson’s contracts coming to an end, will these players chose to stay in WRU-controlled Welsh club rugby?

Investment

There is now no incentive for private capital or benefactors to invest in the sport. Moffett and his chums have already alienated two of the biggest inventors in recent times – Leighton Samuel and Buy As You View – and he’s now working on forcing another investor away (Tony Brown). For Moffett to feed Thomson House with more propaganda about the dangers of losing Welsh stars overseas is frankly ridiculous, when he – almost single handily – bullied Samuel (and his stadium investments and best pitch in Wales) out of the sport. What have you done to increase funding for the sport, Dai?

Forcing out investors like Marcus Russell and Leighton Samuel is frankly criminal – the sport in Wales is desperate for more funds to compete with the Irish, English and French and by putting control in front of development, the WRU is only further impoverishing the sport.

This is ALL about control. If it was about developing the sport, where is the extra money that a Chief Executive is supposed to generate for the sport? Recently, Moffett secured a rumoured £70,000 increase in his salary – not so dissimilar to the £125,000 a year he cut from the sport when he got rid of the A team. The Union are well on the way to destroying great club names like Newport and Cardiff – completely marginalising all support in a concerted effort to remove any barrier to their total control.

What does “together” mean? “Together” for those who agree with you, and stuff those who want to invest in the sport?

No – Moffett set out with an idea in his mind (mainly taken from his experiences in New Zealand) and has steamrollered it through. He has taken no account of local culture and circumstances. His dogmatic approach has alienated those whose interest in Welsh rugby does not come from a career move, but comes from a passion that they will take to their grave – long after Moffett has left for his next job.

The Media

The media gravey train in Wales is firmly behind the Union. The Union feeds the media with wall to wall coverage on the television, and a press office in Thomson House fed daily with the party line. In turn, the media is assured of the exposure it craves and a chance to hob nob with Moffett’s cronies. But of course the ultimate irony is that as a direct result of Moffett’s refusal to include Samuel in his plans for the future of the game, European Cup TV revenue will actually fall this season.

Where have all the real journalists gone? Where is the investigative reporting into what happened to the Warriors? Why are no questions asked about the secrecy surrounding WRU holdings in rugby infrastructure in Wales? Doesn’t the media feel it should ask why investors in the sport – Sameul, Russell and now Brown – are being driven away precisely when the Union has such huge debts and has a responsibility to develop the sport in Wales?

Sure the TV people are happy. Viewing figures keep them in the limelight and they can justify the ridiculous kick off times by claiming they are investing in the sport. But at what cost? Kick off times keep the opinionated armchair fans who don’t invest in Welsh rugby (no season tickets, no match tickets, no merchandising) happy, but discourages attendances (as the facts show).

Conclusion


The Celtic League has provided the perfect platform for the SRU and the WRU to assert their control over top clubs in their countries. And the results in Scotland should be a warning for us all. North of the border, the sport is dying on its knees. Their Union-controlled solution has been a disaster as attendances fall off a cliff. Their three professional clubs roam from one soulless empty stadium to another, playing out defeat after defeat. The Union’s only remedy is to search the world for anyone with a Scottish aunt in a desperate attempt at a short term fix. There is no partnership with local clubs, and no investment from local benefactors.

In Wales, the megalomaniac’s rule – control at all costs and the alienation of thousands of supporters and private investors. Far from increasing the popularity and inclusively of the sport, the WRU is driving people away. Perhaps most importantly, it is also driving away our star players. By alienating non-Union funding, the limited resources mean our best players will leave Wales. And the worse thing of all is that the Union doesn’t care! Far from it! It actively rewards those who leave by giving one the captaincy of a country he no longer lives in!

Pre-Season Results of Celtic League vs Non-Celtic League Sides

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Worcester 12 Cardiff 10
Leicester 31 Cardiff 13
Gloucester 28 Llanelli 6
Llanelli 17 Wasps 20
Toulouse 28 Ospreys 14
Ospreys 5 Bath 15
Edinburgh 0 Leicester 36
Munster 13 Newcastle 6
Munster 5 London Irish 12
Northampton 35 Newport 11
Northampton 47 Edinburgh 17
Ulster 19 Harlequins 26
Connacht 9 Newcastle 32
Connacht 16 London Irish 24
Sale 43 Glasgow 6
Glasgow 20 Sale 39
Leeds 34 Glasgow 3

 

P17 W1 D0 L16

As the Celtic League (CL) and Zurich Premiership (ZP) finally kicks off, the Welsh media is full of comparisons between the two competitions. Are the two leagues really comparable? Can the Celtic League really compete with England’s best? Let’s take a look at how things stand both on and off the pitch.

On the pitch, based on pre-season friendlies, the situation is clear. Only on one occasion when teams from the ZP and CL went head to head, did a CL side come out on top. Home or away, the Celtic sides came off second best – in many cases by a considerable margin. Even in the so-called Anglo-Celtic Challenge, a battling Llanelli – for all their home advantage and huff and puff – came a poor second to a Wasps team missing many of its stars. When the Turks pressed hard and rallied in the second half, the side from Wycombe always had plenty in the tank to surge ahead, playing well within themselves.

Stories from England abound on the increase in season ticket sales on record sales last season. Following an increase of 12% last year, latest reports show a 19% increase this year! The ZP will kick off this weekend with a record crowd of over 50,000 at Twickenham – could a Llanelli vs Cardiff and Ospreys vs Llanelli double header attract even half that figure? Details in the Welsh press are scant – despite desperate attempts to over exaggerate on season ticket figures (Llanelli’s season ticket holders number only 1,000 more than relegation bound Worcester). None of the four teams is proudly proclaiming even modest increases in season ticket numbers. Newport’s second XV have sold more than 1,000 season tickets for the coming season. There is little change on last season and no sign of Newport’s missing 3,000 supporters. Even compared with village league attendances three years ago (see our editorial) attendances are well down – particular due to the mismanagement of the situation at Newport. 2000-1 was a record season for ticket holders – since then Moffett’s presided over a reduction in attendances.

Financially, many ZP are finally breaking even – despite many doom laden predictions in recent seasons that they too were in financial trouble. Northampton have recently announced record profits – profits that Welsh clubs could only dream about. Meanwhile, limited TV coverage ensures the right balance between promotion of the sport and overkill. In Wales, Moffett has sold the soul of the game to the TV companies, and gates have plummeted. Saturday afternoon kick offs are a distant memory in contrast to the ZP. In a mad dash to boost short term finances and clear the WRU debt as fast as possible, he’s quickly destroying the soul of our game – its history, tribalism and traditional highly competitive nature sacrificed in favour of reducing the WRU’s historical financial mismanagement in racking up huge debts for the Millennium Stadium.

Moffett’s target of 8,000 per home game (incidentally, what Cardiff City count as season ticket holders) is a pipe dream, whereas in England, there is no sense that clubs are losing their identity sacrificed in some lemming type dash towards oblivion. “If one suffers, we all suffer!” seems to be the creed of Moffett and his cronies in the press. This farcical idea of inclusion was put into place at the Warriors and what happened? The club went bust. It was put in place at Newport and a forced amalgamation with Ebbw Vale and what happened? Season tickets down. Not content with destroying Ponty and Bridgend, and impoverishing Newport, now Moffett is attacking Cardiff with an ignorant attempt to water down any sense of identity with the club in the nation’s capital city. Cardiff doesn’t need to spread its efforts even more thinly to attract supporters – it needs to attract those right on its own doorstep!!

Meanwhile, successful clubs like London Irish are growing from strength to strength – playing in first class stadium, in front of record crowds and NOT having to sacrifice the name or tradition of the club. In England, success has been built on traditional clubs – Bath, Northampton, Gloucester, Leicester etc.. There is no sign of these proud organisations throwing away their identity, just because London Scottish and Richmond folded due to bad financial planning. In Wales, there seems a curious logic that because some clubs could not compete financially, all must somehow sacrifice their future.

In England, more and more clubs are reporting black balance sheets, high quality overseas players are welcomed with open arms, and clubs are rewarded for producing English internationals – not penalised as in Wales. Top players are limited to a maximum of 32 matches for club and country with clubs receiving £30,000 for each player they provide to the élite squad and £10,000 for a representative in the national academy.

What does the RFU do for the clubs in England? Do they insist on clubs amalgamating? Do they threaten clubs identities by enforcing meaningless recycled names? No. Each Premiership club receives £5 million from the RFU this season to help to pay elite salaries. This is in addition to the £1.9 million for each of the 12 clubs from central funds to cover basic salary costs for all players. In addition, there is an ‘upside’ payment: a contribution based on TV monies, sponsorship deals and the like amounting to £3.5 million.

Meanwhile, Welsh clubs play in a sponsorless league, with match times designed to minimise revenue through the turnstiles and maximise reliance on a crazy Union-negotiated TV deal, have their identity undermined and destroyed and finally receive no reward from the Union for producing the stars of the tomorrow. When we hope for an independent press to report on these difference, we are fed a regular diet of spin and no substance.

And the saddest thing of all is that deep down – despite Moffett’s attempt to whitewash the situation – the press know that traditional rivalries are what sell papers. When it suits them, their happy to give the approaching Cardiff vs Newport game, its true billing as one of the oldest rivalries in rugby.

Whatever happened to survival of the fittest? Abandoning one of the fundaments of sport – winners win and losers come nowhere – led us to this situation. 16-1 …. The scoreboard never lies.

Who the hell are the bloos?

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It seems as though the dictat from the WRU is for the media to refer to each professional team in Wales solely by it’s nickname, rather than it’s full title. The Western Mail is full of gaffs on this subject: constantly writing Blues and then slipping the word “club” into the article, but the club themselves are also slipping into the style by writing just Blues on the web site and other material.

Indeed, the confusion over the name of the team that plays at Rodney Parade led the new Chief Executive to issue his own press release detailing how the press should refer to the team. Of course, they have mostly ignored it and followed the line from Moffett of just using the nicknames. It is also alleged that, when meeting with the disgruntled Warriors supporters after their shutdown, Moffett instructed those guys that all the teams will only be known by their nicknames.

So here is the problem: the media and politically correct public relations lot are following Moffett’s line and only using the nickname of the team.

This leads to an important question that all stakeholders and shareholders in Cardiff RFC must ask themselves: what damage is being done to my investment by this naming and reporting? It’s quite obvious that removing the name “Cardiff” from the team will do commercial damage to the club. If they become known in the popular press and media as just the “Blues” then it is difficult to see what the company represents, where it is based and how it can benefit any potential investors or sponsors. More importantly, it throws away a strong brand name established over the past 128 years.

There is no distinguishing the “Blues” from Chelsea (nicknames the Blues) or even the Auckland Blues. The club has sacrificed a global brand – Cardiff RFC – for a South Wales, media generated brand. Only in a narrow strip around the M4 will the word “Blues” ever hope to mean a rugby team playing in Cardiff. To the rest of the rugby world, the “Blues” play in Auckland. Since when did Cardiff become a pale imitation of some NZ team which has only recently come into existence (a long seven years after CRFC was born)? Rebranding in itself is not necessarily a bad thing, but to pick a brand name already in use by another rugby team is ludicrous!

Without doubt it has long been the WRU’s aim to maximise revenue for themselves and impoverish the clubs (depriving the clubs of their best players, no reward/compensation for clubs who provide players for the national side, a suicidal TV contract that puts short term financial gain over the long term development of the sport). But if Moffett and the WRU-puppies in Thomson House and Llandaff are affecting the financial future of the club, who will speak out? Is the political pressure that the club is succumbing to also affecting the commercial viability of the club? Is the Board at the club defending the clubs shareholders, or merely capitulating to Moffett driven media-pressure?

We would reason that this naming issue is affecting the club and is affecting the marketability of that global rugby name – “Cardiff”. The correct name of the team is the Cardiff Blues, not just the Blues. It represents Cardiff, is owned by Cardiff RFC, plays in Cardiff and is supported by Cardiff. It should be the focal point for rugby supporters in and around the City and it should be using the famous name of Cardiff Rugby for its own benefit. Instead, it is allowing the press and the Union to ruin the identity and dilute the brand. Once more, instead of rewarding excellence, the structure of Welsh rugby says if one is weak, everyone must be weak. If some clubs are forced to amalgamate because they lack the financial clout to survive alone – everyone must surrender their identity.

This must not be allowed to continue. It is time for Peter Thomas to take control of the issue and ensure the club is referred to as Cardiff. Indeed, dropping the Blues altogether would be extremely beneficial, even replacing Blues with “Rugby” if a subtitle is needed. This is the only way to secure the brand, to increase commercial interest and to protect our invested moneys. After all, that is their job.

A lack of ambition?

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2000
Dec 10 Edinburgh 29-11 L
Jan 20 Toulouse 38-27 L
Jan 27 Gloucester 21-15 L
2001
Sept 15 Munster 10-51 L
Oct 6 Montferrand 10-37 L
Nov 3 Glasgow 32-47 L
2002
Apr 19 Edinburgh 32-10 L
Sept 6 Connacht 23-22 L
Sept 14 Borders 15-18 W
Oct 18 Ulster 25-6 L
Nov 30 Edinburgh 22-26 W
Dec 7 Northampton 25-11 L
2003
Jan 18 Biarritz 75-25 L
Sept 5 Glasgow 23-13 L
Sept 26 Borders 22-20 L

Another weekend and yet another sub-standard performance full of unforced errors and a half hearted mental attitude. Should we be surprised by yet another capitulation by Cardiff away from home? And we really mean, AWAY FROM HOME, not a forty minute bus ride down the M4. Half the players probably travel longer to get to training than they would to play AWAY games in Wales!

So why does the clubs woeful record playing outside Wales continue? In the last three seasons (going back to that memorable day at Vicarage Road), Cardiff have played 14 times outside Wales and only managed a victory on two occasions. During the season previous to the victory over Saracens, the bois also managed a victory against the Harlequins.

So does the club focus on winning away from home? Do they prioritise away games? Do we see extra priority being given to curing this achiles heal? Uh no. Things have got MUCH worse. Think how pleased we’d all be with a loss in Toulouse by only 11 points! Back then, we were gutted. Losing by only six points to Gloucester? Fantastic result! Back then, we were suicidal.

Clearly targets have been lowered as fast as standards have fallen. Three seasons ago we had a squad that we thought could compete in Europe. We stood in The Shed and thought we had a chance of making the semi-finals. Now?

The playing staff at CAP are of a considerably lower standard than they were three seasons ago. Back then, Peter Thomas was talking about winning the European Cup and high profile players laid the foundations to the claim that Cardiff were the best club in Wales. Now, they’re barely the best club in Cardiff.

The drive has gone, the willingness to invest has gone and the club seems to be more interested in breaking even in the short term than investing in the future. And that DOESN’T mean sacrificing a bunch of kids to yet another mauling of their confidence. When the club should have been investing in an experienced Argentinian tight head, or a World Class southern hemisphere second row/number 8, the limit of their ambitions was an English journeyman and re-signing Rob Appleyard.

Following defeat against the worst club in the Celtic League – a team who conceded more than 100 points in their previous two games – it seems pretty clear that if the club continues with its present lack of investment, we can expect a tustle with Ruddock’s team for who will NOT be playing in the European Cup next season.

The Supporters

The same old faces are definitely NOT around on the terraces as they were last season. One season of kids against men was bad enough, but rugby fans are simply not prepared to pay to watch another season of sub-standard amateur performances. Even hardened Cardiff nuts are not supporting the club as they once did. Staging home games on a Friday night effectively limits potential spectators to those who work within one hour of CAP. Contrast the clubs attitude with a hugely successful club like Leicester and you begin to see how badly mismanaged Cardiff really. Despite an army of season ticket holders and a guaranteed five figure gate, Leicester stood on principle last season and refused Sky’s request to play on a Friday night. Can you imagine Cardiff RFC doing the same thing?

Away trips on a Friday night show the clubs utter disregard for supporters – Cardiff is most definitely NOT a “supporters’ club”. The club has always been reluctant to offer any assistance to organising away trips (other than as a means of ripping off supporters with inflated travel costs) and instead relies on the dedication and commitment of those who love the club and DON’T put money in their pockets at the forefront of every decision. Away games on a Friday night mean that supporters have to take a day off work to follow the team. When the location for some games – Borders and Connacht are two that spring to mind – is so far from any easy means of transport, the club clearly couldn’t be bothered whether there are Cardiff supporters at the game or not. And the way the club plays away from home, that’s probably not such a bad thing!

Now that we have the Rags attracting more attention (by making travelling to away games nigh on impossible), the club is using rugby at CAP EVERY Saturday as a way of increasing revenue. Whether the first XV win away from home or not is largely irrelevant to the club, as long as those fivers keep getting spent to watch the Rags.

So there you have it. Cardiff RFC is clearly more focussed on bleeding money from supporters in the short run than investing in a winning first XV. Away games are irrelevant – just look at the results! Filling CAP every week is what matters.

… and the implications ….?

Cleary this approach to the running of the club is not sustainable. Once the core supporters lose interest in away games, how long before they lose interest in watching the Rags getting thumped by forty points? How long before they find something better to do with their weekends? When the first XV start bringing the same form they exhibit away from home to shambolic performances at home, how long before gates start falling at CAP? We all know that this has already happened and the club is on a downward spiral.

Next week, Cardiff face Edinburgh in the quarter final of the Celtic Cup. Count the Cardiff supporters in the crowd. Why bother to travel to support your team when they turn in such terrible performances? Edinburgh began this season with only 22 professionals in their squad of 33 and the average age of the squad is under 23. Cardiff should walk the game. Will they? More crucially, does the club care whether they do or not? After all, they’ll have a good crowd at CAP watching the Rags play Pooler and some tasty bar takings after the game when the die hards watch the game in the club house.

Looking at the fixture list, given the present run of form, it’s difficult to see Cardiff winning anything until the crucial game against Ruddock’s team on November 7th. Loose that, and the kids will be playing in the Mickey Mouse Parker Pen next season and you can forget about attracting ANY class players to play at CAP.

Cardiff RFC – “The Greatest” – not at this rate.

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